Gunther’s Head and Hagen’s Heart. Royal Sacrifice in the Lay of Nibelungs
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Keywords

the Nibelungenlied
the Elder Edda
interpretative level
human sacrifice
intra-communal violence

How to Cite

Sarakaeva, A. (2020). Gunther’s Head and Hagen’s Heart. Royal Sacrifice in the Lay of Nibelungs. Corpus Mundi, 1(1), 135-152. https://doi.org/10.46539/cmj.v1i1.8

Abstract

The article deals with the final part of the German epic Nibelungenlied to learn the real significance, cultural and ideological context of these episodes. The author analyzes literary and anthropological theories, as well as archaeological finds to conclude that royal deaths described in the epic reflect the ancient practice of human sacrifice.

https://doi.org/10.46539/cmj.v1i1.8
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References

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